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The Connected Ship: Remote Vessel Monitoring Improves Performance While Reducing Costs

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Smart tracking and monitoring devices can now be found in all kinds of industrial assets—heavy equipment, industrial machines, reefers, trailers, containers, and more. Gartner estimates 8.4 billion connected things are in use today, with the number expected to climb to 20 billion devices by 2020. Connected things have permeated every aspect of our lives, so it’s no surprise that commercial vessels, leisure crafts and workboats have joined the trend.

A remote satellite telematics and engine diagnostics system developed by The AST Group, one of our partners in the UK, allows operators to prevent catastrophic failures, improve vessel performance and fuel economy, reduce labor costs and optimize service schedules with around-the-clock monitoring of a vessel’s engine, generators and other critical components.

iRAMS (Intelligent Remote Asset Management System) automatically collects vessel data in near-real-time and sends it to a portal where users can access diagnostic and efficiency reports and configure the system to send alarms when irregularities are detected. Alerts include engine performance, fuel consumption, fuel burn rate, RPM, temperature, exhaust temperature, oil pressure, boost, throttle and driver behaviour, and more.

Here are some key benefits associated with deploying a remote vessel monitoring solution:

Maximize on-board resources

Processes that require human intervention, such as walkthroughs, inspections and data collection and entry, are automatically executed by iRAMS to reduce human error and ensure access to accurate data for efficient planning and problem-solving. iRAMS helps anticipate and resolve issues before they occur. It also minimizes manual processes, allowing fleet owners to use crews more efficiently and reduce the number of technical personnel on-board.

This is an example of iRAMS identifying a mechanical issue before it developed into an expensive breakdown. The system detected an engine boost anomaly and sent an SMS to the shore-side Operations Manager, who ordered the vessel to return to port. The turbo inducer wheel tips were shuttered and could have entered the turbo engine, causing damage that could have cost up to US$50,000.

Shuttered turbo inducer wheel tips detected by iRAMS

Shuttered turbo inducer wheel tips detected by iRAMS

Improve efficiencies and reduce operational costs Read more ›

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Posted in 3. Maritime / AIS Tagged with: , , ,

Traceable, Foldable Containers Stacking Up the Benefits

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reefer container supply chainHolland Container Innovations is on a mission to tackle the wasteful cost and environmental impact of empty container transport with its 4FOLD foldable container. And ORBCOMM telematics are now an integral part of the solution…  

The humble ocean freight container has changed very little since it was first introduced over half a century ago. Of course, there have been design tweaks and improvements, new materials and locking mechanisms and all sorts of internal developments. But today’s ISO container still has roughly the same dimensions and outward appearance as it always did.

This unit load standardisation has of course revolutionised cargo transport and is arguably a major contributor to global trade as we know it today. But for all the benefits that the container delivers, there is one major drawback. When empty, it takes up (and contains) a lot of space. In fact, imbalances in trade flows mean that fresh air is possibly the single largest commodity being shipped around the world today. Given that a container occupies the same footprint whether it is empty or full, and needs pretty much the same underlying transport infrastructure to move it, empty container repositioning represents a massive cost – to the tune of USD 25 billion per annum on last count – and environmental impact.

traceable containersOver the decades, many companies have tried to address this issue in various ways. One such approach has been collapsible or foldable containers. Previous attempts have failed to gain traction for many reasons, including strength, lost components and folding/unfolding time. But that does not mean that the fundamental concept should be dismissed.

Since 2008, Holland Container Innovations, an initiative born out of Delft University of Technology, has patiently developed a folding container solution dubbed the 4FOLD, which is now being trialled and adopted by global, regional and specialist carriers and forwarders. ORBCOMM’s solar-powered telematics tracking devices and cloud portal are now an integral part of the 4FOLD solution, helping ensure optimal utilisation and ROI to drive adoption of this innovative technology…

Holland 4 Fold container

The 4FOLD container – which as the name implies, allows four empty units to be folded into the same footprint as one single standard 40ft high cube – is watertight and fulfils all the racking and stacking performance requirements of a conventional ISO container.

Read the full Case Study here

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Posted in 3. Maritime / AIS Tagged with: ,

Euroscan Parts & Services: Europe’s Reefer Monitoring ‘Problem Solvers’

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The opening of a brand new, purpose-built, headquarters in the Bavarian town of Kiefersfelden earlier this year marked an important milestone for Euroscan Parts & Services GmbH. Over the past two decades, the family-owned company has carved out a commanding role as the ‘go-to’ technical services expert for reefer truck OEMs, owners and operators deploying ORBCOMM’s Euroscan temperature monitors, recorders and sensors on transport fleets across Germany, Austria and Switzerland. We sat down with company owners Michael and Heike Steinberger at the Transport Logistic 2017 show in Munich to find out more.

Q: When and why did Euroscan Parts & Services get started?

cold chain compliance solutionsHeike: The company was formed as a stand-alone business in 2009, but the journey really started in the early 1980s. That was when Michael decided to start up his own IT business from home – literally in his living room – alongside his regular work. The IT industry was really at a very early stage back then and Michael had become very interested in the potential of computer networks for business and understanding how to build them.

At the time, Michael and his cousin were working as service technicians and engineers with Frigoblock, a big name in truck transport refrigeration machines and still a main player in the business today. They started to see these Euroscan monitoring devices fitted to some of the reefer trucks they were servicing and wanted to find out more.

The rest, as they say, is history! A business was born to help users install and service their Euroscan monitors. We also started as a reseller for Euroscan. It was really a unique chance to combine Michael’s ground-up understanding of refrigeration mechanics, engineering and technology with his passion for computers and IT networks.

How has your business developed over the last 18 years and what are your main services today?

temperature recorder installationWell, we still act as a reseller. We install Euroscan devices. And we service them. So that’s the same. But today the scale of the business is much bigger. We started out with 3 people and today we have 13. We cover all of Germany and Austria, and also Switzerland, where we have a 100% owned daughter company.

In addition, we expanded our services to include service partner training. As we were going out to do work in lots of regional depots and service centres used by our clients, we started to think – wouldn’t it be great if the people here could do some of this work themselves and become our service partners?

While it’s still Euroscan Parts & Services people who do the initial installation and set-up, there is now a big network of service partners whose technicians are trained up by us to our quality standards so they can handle repair and servicing, including dealing with warranty issues and checking calibration of monitoring devices and sensors to ensure they comply with the law. We’ve trained up hundreds of technicians and when they pass our courses they also get certification from us.

Having a network of qualified service partners for these regular activities is beneficial for our customers, because there is more capacity to get the work done promptly and ensure no-one is waiting.

Edeka cold chain installationIt also frees us up to focus larger turnkey projects. Every year, we will have one to three of these big jobs, where we are called in either to install or upgrade Euroscan monitoring and recording systems on a whole fleet. These jobs can involve up to 300 trucks at a time. This year we are doing projects like this for a big international logistics company and also for the supermarket chain Edeka.

When we do a turnkey fleet installation, we will go in to consult to begin with. Then we will create a full project plan. And then we will oversee all the procurement, installation and testing. We love the challenge of these projects, because no two of them are ever exactly the same. So that means we have to keep on learning and progressing, which is really something we enjoy. We like to think of ourselves as the ‘problem solvers’ and these projects keep us on our toes.

You mentioned that you have special projects this year for a big logistics company and a retailer. Can you give us more of an idea about your customer base?

We think there is no food company in Germany of any notable size that doesn’t work with us today. We’re also involved on the pharmaceutical side. So, our customer base goes across all the big OEM refrigerated truck and trailer builders, to the transport and logistics companies, to the supermarket chains that run their own fleets, to the food brands and food service chains, to pharmaceutical distributors and live/breeding stock transport. It’s a very wide range and that allows us to see the issues from all sides.

Tell us about your new facility.

We were simply outgrowing the old site so, about three years ago, we started looking for some land where we could build a brand new facility designed especially for our needs. We bought a plot in Kiefersfelden, the same town where we were already based (and live!)

Kiefersfelden is part of the Rosenheim district of Bavaria in southern Germany and it’s very well connected, both by road and rail. The main rail line linking Germany with Italy runs close by our site, and it’s just a short distance to a major highway.

We moved in this February and are delighted with our new offices. We’ve designed a ‘barrier free building’ so it is easy to move large pieces of equipment through the facility when we need to. And we have a purpose-designed seminar room fitted with the latest training technology.

What does the future hold?

temperature recordersOver the years, we simply grew with the need, and we are still doing so! In the near future, we will be developing our training programme to cover verification and certification for GDP compliance. That’s the new EU rules governing pharma supply chain and logistics, including requirement for temperature control and validation. Some of our service partners are already trained to calibrate temperature recorders for GDP compliance. The GDP rules are very complex and we think there is a growth market here, to help people understand and interpret the laws and ensure they are fully compliant.

We’ve also recently expanded our business to provide IT security solutions for high value transport, like cigarettes for example.

Now that ORBCOMM is introducing its container and intermodal equipment telematics into Europe, we also think this could be an exciting new market, offering us the chance to grow alongside ORBCOMM just like we have done with Euroscan.

EUroscan Parts & Services Team

The Euroscan Parts & Services Team

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Posted in 1. Transportation Tagged with: , ,

RFID As a Service: Core vs. Context

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rfid tagging

Is the ownership/management/expertise of RFID tags, hardware, associated middleware, and application software core to your company, or is the resulting insight into business operations and decision support that the ensuing location and timely data core to how you run your business?

Looking at a RFID as a Service (RaaS) model through the lens of a business’ core and context activities, we can start to identify how and where RaaS can potentially increase productivity and efficiencies.

In his book, Living On The Fault Line, Geoffrey A. Moore makes the case that companies should solely focus on core activities and outsource all other activities.

“For core activities, the goal is to differentiate as much as possible on any variable that impacts customers’ purchase decisions and to assign one’s best resources to that challenge. By contrast, every other activity in the corporation is not core it is context. And the winning approach to context tasks is not to differentiate but rather to execute them effectively and efficiently in as standardized a manner as possible.”

In addition Moore states, “There is no context task that cannot become someone else’s core task.” To the question of why other people can do a better job at a company’s context tasks, Moore’s answer is simple and concise: “this is where they are putting their A team. It’s context to you but is core to them.

Let’s apply this model to RaaS — the underlying message in Moore’s definition for software applications is companies can become much more efficient and effective if they focus their internal software deployment on core tasks only, and outsource context software tasks to vendors that specialize in these particular areas. This has tremendous impact to understanding the dynamic between on-premise software and RaaS applications.

The RaaS model outsources the complexity of generating and maintaining RFID and sensor hardware and software, while owning and exercising full control over information the system generates, providing the ability to increase performance of core business activities.

To better understand the relevance of Moore’s insight and how it relates to RaaS, let’s consider the primary components of a RaaS solution and where they fall into the context vs. core paradigm… Read more ›

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Posted in 5. M2M/IoT Trends, 6. Networks Tagged with: , ,

IoT Data Providing the Smarts for the Digital Ports and Terminals of the Future

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reefer container supply chainTechnology to track containers, cargo and transport assets on the move has been around a long time in various guises, but today is part of an explosive global trend towards Machine-to-Machine (M2M) telematics devices and sensors, as part of the burgeoning Internet of Things (IoT).

All over the world, we are seeing port authorities looking at how to get ‘smarter’, using digital technologies to help them optimize traffic flows, deal with bigger cargo peaks and congestion risks resulting from larger ships, and maximize infrastructure utilization.

Ports are very complex organisms, with many different interests and activities to juggle on the waterside and landside, and a huge amount of information that needs to change hands between various supply chain members and government entities as goods pass through.

Live data provided by IoT and M2M applications is increasingly seen as a prerequisite for the ‘digital port of the future’. Real-time visibility drives optimization, by providing insight on what is happening versus what was planned, and allowing smart decisions to be made as a result. Data generated IoT and M2M applications can be shared, used and analyzed in new ways among multiple stakeholders in the port community. We will undoubtedly see many more examples of connectivity in the future, ranging from telematics on trucks, trailers, chassis, gensets and containers, to devices on cranes and other handling equipment.

Live data provided by M2M and IoT applications is increasingly seen as a prerequisite for the ‘digital port of the future’.

Live data provided by M2M and IoT applications is increasingly seen as a prerequisite for the ‘digital port of the future’.

“Intelligent equipment” is a current focus for global container terminal operators such as APM Terminals, which is looking at how it can use new IoT and sensor technologies to get much better insight into the location, status, performance and safety of their very large asset bases. Read more ›

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Posted in 3. Maritime / AIS, 5. M2M/IoT Trends Tagged with: , , , , ,

Digitizing Container Supply Chains: Why Live Data from the IoT Holds the Key

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Maritime history is usually divided into separate eras: the Age of Navigation, the Age of Discovery, the Age of Sail, the Age of Steam and the Rise of Steamships and Motorships. During this time, innovations such as steering oars and rudders, navigation by the stars, the keel, the triangular sail, maritime engines and the chronometer have redefined what was possible.

In the 21st century, it is time for technology to lead a new revolution

transporttopics_containers_300x250In ocean freight supply chains, meaningful innovation is long overdue. The container shipping industry in the past decade and more has been characterized by intense peaks and troughs, rivalries and rate wars – but little in the way of real technological innovation. While container ships, ports and inland logistics alike have gotten much larger, they have not become much smarter, nor more connected to the wider logistics ecosystem.

But not for much longer, it seems. A wave of change is coming to container supply chains both on land and, increasingly, at sea, driven on the one hand by rapid advances in the cloud, digitization, automation and autonomous traffic, and on the other by evolving market dynamics.

In contrast to just a couple of years back, technology-enabled change is increasingly on the senior management agenda as an “when, not if” response to help manage massive complexity and scale, strip out waste and cost, and repurpose the ponderous might of maritime container trade for the on-demand era of Amazon and Alibaba.

New technology plays are now coming thick and fast – and not just from ‘disruptive’ start-ups. Consider Maersk’s evolving digital container logistics strategy, including recent tie-ups with Microsoft and IBM, on top of its smart container program. Or OneSea, a consortium of established marine and IT names with a vision to make autonomous commercial maritime traffic a reality by 2025. Or the tie-up between Port of Los Angeles and GE to launch a digital port information platform. Or DP World’s recently-announced cargo tracking initiative for shippers. The list goes on. The technology genie is well and truly out of the bottle – even if current reality does not, yet, match up to the digital hype.

connected containers

A wave of change is coming to container supply chains, driven on the one hand by rapid advances in the cloud, digitization, automation and autonomous traffic, and on the other by evolving market dynamics.

Commercially and operationally, what these digital initiatives share as a goal, and a need, is comprehensive, automated, systematic visibility to events, processes and status. The OneSea project may seem like an outlier here, but just try and run an unmanned ship, or robotized container terminal, or automated warehouse, without data.

Of course, the container supply chain is already awash with information – commercial, legal and operational. Indeed, the cost of physically moving a container is less than half the cost of handling the information related to its transport, said Maersk in a 2016 study of the trade pipeline. All this latent data can potentially deliver lots of operational and business value when properly mined on a massive, automated scale, as some start-ups are now setting out to do.

But all too often, the data on which supply chains rely remains after the fact, fragmented and unreliable – not surprising, given how much manual keying and rekeying is still involved. This may be a rather shaky foundation on which to build the digital revolution. At the TOC Asia conference this April, Electrolux executive Bjorn Vang Jensen lamented that the shipper currently gets “horrible visibility” from its container supply chain and that “data is not satisfactory.”

This is where Internet of Things (IoT) technology comes in. Worldwide, we are witnessing an explosion of ‘smart, connected things’, exploiting technological advances and reducing costs in telematics devices, sensors, applications, software and communications networks – including cellular, satellite and near-field. Analyst IHS Markit predicts 30.7 billion IoT devices in consumer and industrial use by 2020, rising to 75.4 billion in 2025.

As discussed in our new podcast for The Loadstar IoT connectivity is now being actively adopted on a growing array of container transport assets, including dry and refrigerated containers, chassis and gensets, both for domestic and international maritime operations. One recent large-scale adopter is US multimodal giant JB Hunt, installing solar-based IoT tracking devices with internal cargo sensors on more than 90,000 intermodal containers and trailers.

Technology is now enabling users to track not just the in-transit and geo-fenced location of their assets at any given time, but also the actual status of both asset and cargo – from loaded vs empty, internal temperature/atmosphere, shock, motion, fuel and oil levels, to tyre pressures, door open/close, device on/off, tampering/intrusion and more.

Until recently, the ocean leg has been something of a ‘black hole’ in all of this. That visibility gap is now being closed thanks to developments in low-cost, on-ship cellular GSM networks like VesselConnect, our new solution just launched in partnership with Vobal Technologies. The first adopter is US carrier TOTE Maritime Puerto Rico, long a proponent of smart containers, which is using the system to monitor on-water refrigerated shipments of pharma and food cargoes.

Why does this all matter to broader container supply chain digitization efforts? Because data from connected containers (read chassis, gensets, vessels) is reliable, real and real-time. It reveals what is, versus what was planned or anticipated, in the moment, shining a light not just on asset operations but on supply chain processes, flows and hand-offs – not least in the complex ship-port-landside interface.

remote container managementIt’s telling that recent adopters such as JB Hunt cite the ability to deliver better supply chain visibility to their customers as a prime reason for investing in container and trailer telematics, allowing them to deliver new value beyond just transportation. In a short space of time, asset tracking could become just the basic entry level for IoT adoption, with supply chain network optimization as the considerably bigger prize.

For global maritime container supply chains, the next decade may come to be known as the Age of Visibility. Change is certainly coming and the current and next generation of IoT technology will be central to the transformation, in ways we probably don’t yet even grasp.

ORBCOMM is looking forward to taking part in the forthcoming TOC Europe Conference in Amsterdam, June 27-29, as a sponsor and speaker. We’ll be joining a session in the Container Supply Chain Conference looking at how digitalization can help the industry achieve higher performance to discuss how the IoT is evolving and what this means for all the supply chain stakeholders

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Posted in 1. Transportation, 3. Maritime / AIS Tagged with: , , ,

Hurricane Business Continuity: Wireless Failover Keeps You Connected When Disaster Strikes

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hurricane internet failoverFor businesses on the U.S. East coast, hurricane disaster is a real possibility every year. In 2012, Hurricane Sandy became the second costliest superstorm in America’s history, impacting over 300,000 US businesses with assessed damages in the range of $75 billion USD.

Network outages due to damaged wirelines were reported to have led to loss of revenue and halting of business operations where companies were no longer able to process transactions and employees were unable to access company networks and data.

Despite so much at stake, few businesses residing in high-risk areas take preventative measures against loss of internet connectivity. In a previously published post on wireless failover for business continuity, we discussed reasons why more and more companies are choosing to adopt a failover solution to maintain uninterrupted connectivity in the event of a network outage.

First of all, it’s preventative. When the primary wired connection goes down due to a short-term malfunction or long-term catastrophe, a backup wireless failover solution will kick in automatically to deliver sustained connectivity, both for external transactions and internal operations.

But what about cost? The key to a good wireless failover solution is that it offers an affordable, cost-effective way to ensure continuity of business in the event of a network outage. It’s a form of insurance that brings peace of mind to any business, especially in times of inclement weather. It further saves money by limiting the number of IT personnel needed for on-site technical maintenance through an option called out-of-band management, which allows for remote troubleshooting and configuration of network devices.

Security is also at the forefront of today’s business concerns. Fortunately, good wireless network failover solutions are able to integrate into existing security structures with strict measures in place, such as PCI compliance for credit card security.

hurricane business continuity

The Economist reported when Hurricane Sandy struck that wirelines were soaked with salty flood water causing disruption of internet services to millions of customers. It was a natural disaster that tested the readiness of businesses to cope with disaster. “Firms are increasingly reliant on networks, but often fail to understand the risks that networks bring,” management guru Don Tapscott was quoted as saying in the article.

No company expects that at any one time, a long-term network outage could have such a catastrophic effect on their bottom line, but it’s something that could strike in any given year. Just like car or health insurance, it’s not something you think about when the going is good, but it’s when the going gets bad that it really counts.

Protect your business with a hurricane preparedness failover solution. Learn more at www2.orbcomm.com/hurricane, or contact us for more information.

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Posted in 6. Networks Tagged with: , , ,

Podcast: The Road to Supply Chain Logistics Digitization

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In the latest podcast by The Loadstar supply chain logistics news portal, ORBCOMM’s Christian Allred (SVP & GM Global Sales) and Michael Dempsey (VP Container and Port Solutions) talk industry trends and developments in connecting road and intermodal assets with Internet of Things (IoT) technology.

Listen to this podcast, recorded live at Transport Logistic in Munich (where ORBCOMM launched its new VesselConnect solution), to hear how new technology is meeting the needs of a changing regulatory environment, as well as growing expectations from cargo owners and their logistics services providers.

ORBCOMM is looking forward to taking part in the forthcoming TOC Europe Conference in Amsterdam, June 27-29, as a sponsor and speaker. We’ll be joining a session in the Container Supply Chain Conference looking at how digitalization can help the industry achieve higher performance to discuss how the IoT is evolving and what this means for all the supply chain stakeholders.

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Posted in 1. Transportation, 3. Maritime / AIS Tagged with: , , ,

AIS Data: Advocating for our Oceans with 22 Million Points Per Day

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Marine-Satellite_2017_300-x-250In May, Reuters reported that authorities in West Africa detained seven Chinese vessels for fishing illegally. In Guinea, Sierra Leone and Guinea-Bissau, inspectors boarded the ships to find violations of regulations relating to catching protected fish and using nets with small holes to facilitate bigger hauls. Boat owners could be subject to millions of dollars in fines.

A recent study by Frontiers in Marine Science states that West Africa’s annual losses from illegal and unregulated fishing costs $2.3 billion. However, the consequences of illegal fishing travels far beyond this geography.  From a global perspective, the World Wildlife Fund estimates that more than 85 per cent of the world’s fisheries are reaching their biological limits due to overfishing, due in part to illegal fishing and other regulatory problems.

To turn this around, Global Fishing Watch—a collaboration by OceanaGoogle and SkyTruth to end Illegal, Unreported and Unregulated (IUU) fishing—is using ORBCOMM’s extensive global satellite Automatic Identification System (AIS) data capabilities to help collect more than 22 million data points per day from hundreds of thousands of ships. With this information, anyone can monitor and track large commercial fishing vessels in near real time.

ais data powers global fishing watch

Using AIS data from ORBCOMM, Global Fishing Watch shows commercial fishing activity from Jan 2012 to three days prior to present time.

Global Fishing Watch can classify the time-stamped positional vessel data points as either “fishing” or “non-fishing” activities. This will have a critical impact on the commercial fishing industry’s accountability, environmental regulation compliance and seafood supply chain transparency. It also provides a tool to governments, non-government organizations (NGOs) and researchers for the enforcement of IUU regulations and Marine Protected Areas (MPAs).

In the words of Leonardo DiCaprio, the actor/activist co-funding Global Fishing Watch, “This platform will empower citizens across the globe to become powerful advocates for our oceans.”

Learn more about Global Fishing Watch at www.globalfishingwatch.org. To discover the world of possibilities enabled by ORBCOMM AIS data, meet with us at GEOINT 2017 in San Antonio this week, or contact us anytime to talk vessel tracking with satellite AIS.

More on Vessel Tracking with Satellite
VMS: Providing Safety and Regulatory Compliance for Mexican Fishing Vessels

Learn how Mexico’s National Commission on Aquaculture and Fisheries (CONAPESCA) uses ORBCOMM technology to maintain an electronic nautical mapping system with delimitations of the maritime waters, define and monitor geofences with defined rules of operation, broadcast notifications for emergency, area restrictions, fishing in a restricted zone etc., and track vessels that are in the water and disconnected or not transmitting their location.

Download the Case Study

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Posted in 3. Maritime / AIS Tagged with: , , , ,

GPS Tracking in the World’s Harshest Terrain: Rhino Charge 2017

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IDP-782 dual-mode vehicle trackingORBCOMM devices and connectivity are designed to handle even the toughest demands of non-stop real-time security, safety and tracking in some of Africa’s most extreme locations. How rugged? Every year, ORBCOMM’s dual-mode cellular-satellite IDP-782 device is put through extreme data requirements in a harsh and dusty environment, in one of the world’s most exciting and challenging 4×4 competitions.

Once again this year, ORBCOMM’s IDP-782 iwas installed by our partner RiverCross Tracking on all-terrain vehicles traversing the African wild back country during the “Rhino Charge” off-road vehicle rally in Kenya, aimed at raising funds and awareness for the Rhino Ark Charitable Trust. All funds raised by Rhino Charge are donated to Rhino Ark to help conserve central Kenya’s Aberdare Conservation area. The course includes checkpoints scattered over approximately 100 sq km of rough terrain, including ravines, boulder fields and dry river beds, proving to be a challenging setting for any security, safety and tracking application. The competition requires vehicles to drive the shortest distance between 13 guard posts in 10 hours.

vehicle tracking at Rhino Charge Kenya

The shortest distance between two points can sometimes be a little bit dicey.

Read more ›

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Posted in 1. Transportation Tagged with: , , , ,

ORBCOMM is a single source provider of multi-network connectivity, leading edge devices and powerful applications for industries including transportation and distribution, heavy equipment, oil and gas, maritime and government.
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